Rijksoverheid logo

Biosecurity Self-scan Toolkit

Version 1.7-RELEASE © 2012-2015 RIVM

Accountability for materials

Has biosecurity been ensured in such a way that also deliberate dispersion is being prevented? Biosafety (measures to prevent accidental dispersion and/or exposure from laboratory source): A variety of legislation and regulations as well as practical rules focus on the safety of personnel and possible risks to the environment. Regulations on biological safety (biosafety) stipulate that high-risk biological agents may only be handled in appropriately classified work spaces. These regulations assume the careful handling of all such biological materials.
Are risk assessments carried out, periodically, and do they also take into account the differences between unintentional and deliberate acts? Risk assessments form the basis of effective policy on both biosafety and biosecurity.
Are new biological agents purchased according to a certain procedure? An example of such a procedure for the purchase of biological agents is a purchasing system that automatically sends out a signal when other or larger quantities of materials are being purchased than would normally be the case.
Does the organisation have an up-to-date list available containing all biological agents on the premises, including their storage and handling locations? Organisations are required to know which materials are being stored and where.
Are the amounts of materials on the premises limited to minimal quantities? Organisations should not have an oversupply of materials in stock.
Can the life cycle of all high-risk biological agents be traced – from the moment of purchase up to the time of processing? The location of all biological agents must be known.
Do all unusual or suspect transactions trigger an administrative response to investigate biosecurity aspects related to the purchase or arrival of new biological agents? An example of a procedure for the purchase of biological agents is a purchasing system that automatically sends out a signal when other or larger quantities of materials are being purchased than would normally be the case.
Are stocks being monitored and regularly (e.g. once a month) compared against stock registration? This question refers to whether the organisation has a clear picture of which biological agents actually are on the premises and if quantities match those of the registered stock. Furthermore, is there a protocol for when quantities do not match, and do such anomalies lead to further investigation into the missing biological agents or quantities thereof?
When biological agents are disposed of to be processed in the autoclave, does subsequent verification occur to ensure that the materials have actually been taken to the autoclave? A procedure must be in place to monitor and verify the actual destruction of stock material.
Do the entrance doors to laboratories and storage spaces provide clear indication (at a glance) of the presence of biological substances without specific identification of these substances? From the perspective of biosafety, it is necessary to provide clear indication of the presence of specifically high-risk biological agents. However, from a biosecurity perspective, detailed information should only be available to authorised personnel.